Secrets of the Hieroglyphs revealed in Tigrigna and Amarigna

Elias Kifle | August 13th, 2009

New book reveals the dual languages of the hieroglyphs

Until now, it has not been possible to accurately speak the language written in ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs. What we have known up to now about the meanings, spellings, and pronunciations of the ancient words have merely been estimates, arrived through the best attempts of 19th and 20th century Egyptologists.

But now, with the release of the new book, “Amarigna & Tigrigna Qal Hieroglyphs for Beginners,” we can learn how to accurately read, understand, and speak the language most often regarded as the world’s first written language, the way they spoke it 5100 years ago. And for the over 30 million Amarigna and Tigrigna speakers worldwide, it is just a matter of learning to read hieroglyphs.

“Amarigna & Tigrigna Qal Hieroglyphs for Beginners” was written after 20 years of meticulous research, attempting to match the ancient Egyptian words to various languages around the world. Unexpectedly, as it turns out, the hieroglyphs record not one but two related languages, Amarigna and Tigrigna, still spoken in today’s Ethiopia and Eritrea. The reason for this, as the book explains in the brief introduction, the founders of ancient Egypt were from today’s neighboring regions of Ethiopia and Eritrea.

The words of Amarigna and Tigrigna match those of the hieroglyphs precisely, letter-for-letter, even long, complicated spellings and phrases. And “Amarigna & Tigrigna Qal Hieroglyphs for Beginners” reveals the ancient name of Egypt, as “Gebts” (“Egypt” is the Greek equivalent of “Gebts”).

“If his discovery is real, it is phenomenal and revolutionary,” states Fikre Tolossa, Ph.D. Literature and Ethiopian poet/playwright, in the book’s preface. “Its impact on the study of hieroglyphs, Amharic and Tigrigna languages, as well as on the history of Egypt, Ethiopia, and Eritrea, is tremendous. Even the skeptics will have to examine it before they decide to reject or accept it.”

“If I were an Egyptologist (or even an Ethiopist),” Dr. Tolossa goes on to state in the preface of the book, “I would grab this book immediately and read it frantically. I would also be prompted to study right away Ethiopian and Eritrean languages, such as Amharic and Tigrigna, to delve into the world Mr. Legesse Allyn asserts his research has uncovered.”

Look for the book in bookstores and at online retailers. For more information or to buy the book direct, go to http://books.ancientgebts.org

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