Woyanne official banned from entering Canada

Elias Kifle | June 8th, 2008

CALGARY – Ethiopian ex-pats waiting to ask tough questions of an Ethiopian governor of the Gambella region did not get the opportunity here Saturday afternoon after the official was a no-show, having been denied entry into the country a day earlier.

Omot Obang Olom was set to appear at the First Church of the Nazarene and was expected to talk about the new economic opportunities in the Gambella region of Ethiopia.

Olom has been accused by some human rights advocates of involvement in a 2003 massacre by government troops which left 400 people of Anuak ethnicity dead. However, supporters say Omot had no involvement and he has said he tried to stop the killings.

Members of the media were told by organizers Olom would not be making an appearance after he was denied entry into Canada Friday morning.

“The Canadian government did not give us a reason and we do not know why he is not allowed in the country,” said organizer Gatkuoth Bim.

Opponents of Olom’s visit were pleased by the development.

“He has no right to come to talk to Ethiopian people in Canada when he has been accused of human rights violations,” said Obang Metho, director of international advocacy with the Anuak Justice Council.

Ojulu Didumo, who travelled from Edmonton early Saturday morning to attend, said he was disappointed at the cancellation and was looking forward to asking questions about what happened in 2003.

“We have family members who have been affected by what’s going on in the country and I think we are owed some answers,” he said.

Canadian Border Services could not be reached for comment.

By Michelle Butterfield, The Calgary Herald
mbutterfield@theherald.canwest.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: Great job Obang Metho and friends. You succeeded in chasing away the monstrous criminal from Canada. Shame on the U.S. Government for allowing this guy, who slaughtered hundreds of Ethiopians in cold blood, to enter the United State. It is the work of that a heartless witch,Jendayi Frazier, who is in charge of U.S. policy on Africa.