What Should the World Do and Not Do To Save Ethiopians?


Alemayehu G. Mariam

Nearly a quarter of a century ago, Time Magazine on its cover page asked two weighty questions about recurrent famines in Ethiopia: “Why are Ethiopians starving again? What should the world do and not do” to help them? In my commentary last week, I gave ten reasons in response to the first question; here I offer ten more for the second.

Famine Eth 1987For the past one-half century, the “Western world” has been the principal source of charity and handouts in Ethiopia. For the last two decades, the West has been feeding the regime of dictator Meles Zenawi with billions of dollars of development and humanitarian aid while filling the stomachs of starving Ethiopians with empty words and emptier promises. Now that another famine is spreading like wildfire in that country, the question remains: “What should the Western world do and not do to help Ethiopians permanently escape the endless cycles of famine described in the sugarcoated language of the self-serving international aid agencies as “acute food insecurity, extreme malnutrition, green drought and food crisis”.

Ten Things the World Should Do and Not Do to Help Starving Ethiopians

Take the moral hazard out of Western aid in Ethiopia. 

Western taxpayers have been footing the bill to provide a fail-safe insurance policy for the dictatorship of Meles Zenawi on the theory that he is too servile to fail (not unlike the notion of corporations that are too big to fail). Zenawi has proven to be a reliable proxy warfighter for the West in the Horn. He has received hearty congratulations for a “fantastic Somalia job” even though his invasion created the worst humanitarian crises in Africa in the last decade. Tony Blair appointed him to his Commission for Africa. He has been the West’s man in Africa on climate change.  In return, the West has provided Zenawi billions of dollars in “safety net” aid, multilateral loans and a perpetual supply of relief handouts to insulate his regime from the natural consequences of a mismanaged economy, debilitating corruption and proliferating poverty and famine.  The West should now stand back and let Zenawi face the consequences of chronic budget deficits, galloping inflation, corruption and empty grain silos. Turning a blind eye to gross human rights violations and Western complicity in the regime’s denial of democratic rights to Ethiopians presents not only a moral hazard but also irrefutable evidence of moral bankruptcy. 

Put humanity and human rights back in Western humanitarian aid in Ethiopia. 

The West should treat the starving people of Ethiopia as human beings, not as pawns in a strategic regional chess game or as pitiful objects of charity and handouts.  The root cause of the food famine in Ethiopia is an underlying political famine of democracy, rule of law, lack of accountability and transparency and flagrant human rights abuses. More democracy and greater respect for human rights necessarily means less famine and starvation because a government that is not able, willing and ready to feed its people will be swept out of office by a hungry and angry electorate. The West should tie its aid to specific and measurable improvements in human rights observances and properly functioning democratic institutions. If Western aid and loans are decoupled from human rights and good governance, they become powerful tools of oppression, persecution and subjugation in the hands of dictators.

Promote and support a stable and healthy Ethiopian society through aid, not entrench an iron-fisted and malignant dictatorship.

Western donors believe that they can buy “stability” in the Horn of Africa region by spending billions of aid dollars to support the Zenawi dictatorship. But they remain willfully ignorant of the lessons of history. Supporting a dictator is as risky as carrying an open powder keg at a fireworks festival. As we have recently seen, the West for decades supported dictators Ben Ali in Tunisia, Hosni Mubark in Egypt and Gadahafi in Libya. For a time, these dictators staged the illusion of stability, control and permanence for the West. But they all went up in smoke when young Mohammed Bouazizi torched himself to end a life of oppression and indignity.  In the long run, the West knows no amount of foreign aid or loans could possibly buffer Zenawi’s dictatorship from a tsunami of popular upheaval.  Shouldn’t they stand on the right side of history as President Obama often exhorts?

Never bankroll bad actions by dictators with good Western taxpayer money. 

The West has a bad habit of rewarding the bad acts of African dictators with more and larger amounts of Western taxpayer-supported aid and loans.  After Zenawi stole the 2005 elections in broad daylight, jailed nearly all of the opposition leaders, human rights advocates, civic society leaders in the country and mowed down nearly two hundred unarmed demonstrators and wounded nearly eight hundred, the West gave him billions in aid and loans. In 2008 alone, Zenawi received $3 billion, the largest amount of aid in Africa. Zenawi must indubitably believe that there is a linear cause and effect relationship between his human rights abuses and increased foreign aid and loans.  It seems to be a simple case of operant conditioning in which behavior and actions follow a system of rewards and disincentives.  If human rights violations are always reinforced by the positive reinforcement of increasing amounts of aid, there will be more and more outrageous abuses committed to obtain that outcome.   

Make partnership with the Ethiopian people, not the Zenawi dictatorship.

There is documentary evidence from Wikileaks cablegrams to show that the West basically wants a “guy they can do business with” in Ethiopia. The core business of the West in Ethiopia and the Horn is counterterrorism. Zenawi invaded Somalia in 2006 and neraly three years later packed up and left.  Today Al Shabab and the other warlords still operate in Somalia with impunity. A partnership with a dictator on a single issue is not only short-sighted but also counterproductive to the long-term strategic interests of the West in Ethiopia and the Horn. That is why the West should nurture a long-term partnership with the Ethiopian people based on a demonstrable commitment to good governance, the rule of law, accountability, anti-corruption practices, private sector development, basic education and health services and so on. The easiest way to sever a relationship with the people is to give a fat welfare check (free money) to a depraved dictatorship year after year.

Hold the local paymasters of aid accountable.

Zenawi’s regime today is accountable to no one for the famine that is spreading throughout the country or the aid that it receives from the West. The international aid bureaucrats dare not question Zenawi fearing his legendary torrent of scorn, mockery and insults. They are mere rubberstamps of Zenawi’s regime. Recently, when Ken Ohashi, the World Bank Country Director for Ethiopia said Zenawi’s economic plan (“Growth and Transformation Plan”) is unsustainable, Zenawi derided him as a neocolonial overseer: “The World Bank [country] director is used to having other developing nations simply listen to his orders and is not used to nations refusing implement policy based on their wishes.” Last year Zenawi called the European Union Election Observers’ report “garbage”.

Whenever questions are raised about the misuse and abuse of aid money, the international aid bureaucrats run for cover or get into high gear to deny any improprieties and wrongdoing. For instance, Human Rights Watch and more recently BIJ/BBC have made serious and well-supported allegations of political weaponization of the so-called “safety net” aid.  In July 2010, the Development Assistance Group, a coordinating body of 26 foreign donor institutions for Ethiopia, issued a whitewash report which concluded that the administration of the aid programs is the “supported by relatively robust accountability systems.” In the past couple of weeks, USAID Deputy Administrator Gregory Gottlieb spoke to the Voice of America and declared, “There is no famine in Ethiopia.” Yet an  audit report by the independent Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of US AID  in March 2010 came to the distressing conclusion that USAID has no idea what is happening to its agricultural programs in Ethiopia. By rejecting the data generated by the regime and local USAID officials, the OIG implicitly indicts them for manufacturing data to make things look good.  The West must call a spade a spade, insist on the truth and let the chips fall where they may!

Condition aid and loans on the implementation of comprehensive family planning programs in Ethiopia. 

Recently, the U.S. Census Bureau had frightening predictions for Ethiopia. By 2050, Ethiopia’s population will more than triple to 278 million, placing that country in the top 10 most populous countries in the world. Ethiopia’s population growth has been spiraling upwards for decades.   Since 1995, the average annual rate of population growth has remained at over 3 percent. Comprehensive family planning services are essential to avoiding the predicted doomsday forty years from now. Such services educate, train and prepare couples and families when and how many children to have, provide them contraceptive counseling and help them acquire skills to prevent and manage sexually transmitted diseases, among other things. A decade ago, the World Health Organization and the World Bank estimated that $3.00 per person per year would provide basic family planning, maternal and neonatal health care to women in developing countries, including contraception, prenatal, delivery and post-natal care and postpartum family planning and promotion of condoms to prevent sexually transmitted infections. A decade or two from now when it is too late, providing such services in Ethiopia will be prohibitively expensive.

To help the starving people of Ethiopia, help Ethiopian women.

The distressing status of women in Ethiopian society has been documented over the past decade. The U.S. State Department Country Reports on Human Rights Practices (2000) reported: “Violence and societal discrimination against women, and abuse of children remained problems, and female genital mutilation (FGM) is widespread.” The situation remains pretty much the same in 2011. Western aid should seriously focus on improving the status of women and go beyond empty rhetoric. For instance, there is a lot of talk and window-dressing by the USAID about the empowerment and advancement of women in Ethiopia, but the rhetoric falls short of demonstrable outcomes. USAID claims to have helped thousands of rural women obtain microfiance, and through its extension services enabled hundreds of families adopt better technologies to improve their productivity. USAID also claims to have helped remove “road blocks to development” by improving gender integration, expanding educational opportunity, increased awareness of legal rights and so on and by “providing high-impact, results-oriented technical assistance that promotes participation and transparency.”  There is little convincing evidence in the public reports of USAID to support any of these claims. In any case, given the chummy and cozy relationship between the local USAID operatives and Zenawi’s regime and the OIG’s audit referenced above, one would have to take USAID’s word not just with a grain but a big sack of salt.

To help the starving people of Ethiopia, help Ethiopia’s youth.

Seventy percent of Ethiopia’s population is said to be under the age of thirty. This past May, USAID announced that it will partner with Pact (an NGO) and UNICEF to implement five-year, $100 million program to benefit over 500,000 Ethiopian orphans and vulnerable children affected by HIV and AIDS. The program “will support efforts by the Ethiopian Government and civil society to standardize comprehensive care and support services for vulnerable children and their families.” Reliance on a combination of donor-funded NGOs, regime-managed and –owned civil society organizations and bloated bureaucracies to implement such a program is manifestly unconvincing. The fact of the matter is that Ethiopia’s youth need access to better educational and employment opportunities now. Youth alienation, joblessness, nihilism breed despair and anarchy which the country can ill-afford.

The West should know that aid and loans will not save Ethiopia.

The West should know that neither aid nor loans will save Ethiopia. Only Ethiopians, poor and famished as they are, can save Ethiopia and themselves.

Starve the Beast, Feed the People.

The West should heed the words of Helen Epstein:

The problem with foreign aid in Ethiopia is that both the Ethiopian government and its donors see the people of this country not as individuals with distinct needs, talents, and rights but as an undifferentiated mass, to be mobilized, decentralized, vaccinated, given primary education and pit latrines, and freed from the legacy of feudalism, imperialism, and backwardness. It is this rigid focus on the ‘backward masses,’ rather than the unique human person, that typically justifies appalling cruelty in the name of social progress.

Stop the cruelty. Starve the beast and feed the people.

Previous commentaries by the author are available at: www.huffingtonpost.com/alemayehu-g-mariam/ and http://open.salon.com/blog/almariam/

 

  

 

 


8 thoughts on “What Should the World Do and Not Do To Save Ethiopians?

  1. Mamo on

    Very well stated. It still bothers me how the TPLF regime got more aid after it murdered 200 of our people.

  2. Mola Maru on

    You said it clear and loud Alemayhu, we all know by now that aid is not a solution at all. If Ethiopia does not stop this cycle of asking for food aid year in year out things will never change. What is funny is most of the European countries who are giving food aid to Ethiopia are smaller or equal to one of the kiflehagers of Ethiopia such as Shewa or Gojam. The Indian guy who leased large fertile land in western Ethiopia was heard saying ” you can feed a nation from this land” . It is true if we have a responsible government who works hard to harness and develop our resources we could be the richest nation in Africa. Woyane government is wasting money and resouce in Somalia which is not our war. They are loosing sleep on trying to put economic sanction on Eritrea – how pathetic to wish ill to your neighbours.
    It makes me sick to think what the woyanes are doing.

  3. love on

    I don’t think you are getting. Any help you are demanding, as we always have this donor mentality, they [the West] has to get something back. There is no free lunch money. I don’t understand why developing nations are saying the West should do this the way should do that. You want freedom then liberate yourself. For instance if you stop by a shop, you obviously have to give money to get the product you want. So why do we poor nations keep asking for a hand out even advice for that matter and expect nothing in return? Believe most of the time, what they always ask would be that impoverishes the mass and then we go back complaining the West is helping dictators. What I believe the demand should be to stop the West for being insturment of oppression through dictatorships. It is their arms that is killing people, their economic policy and structual adjustment through IMF and World bank that is impoverishing people. Again, it is up to us to liberate oursleves and the least the West can do if they can’t be genuine allies and friends of Ethiopia, stop supporting oppression of TPLF on Ethiopian people.

    Long live Ethiopia

  4. Anonymous on

    OH ALMIGHTY CREATOR PROTECT OUR WOMEN IN THE AREB WORLD SINCE WE ARE NOT SAYING NOTHING ABOUT IT. ETHIOPIAN SPEAK UP YOUR VOICE IS THE LAST THING NO MAN CAN NOT CONTROL. SPEAK UP AGAINST EVIL DEEDS THAT IS HAPPENING ON OUR WOMEN IN THE ARAB WORLD. SPEAK UP SPEAK UP

  5. Eritreawi on

    Ato Alemayehu,

    You are missing the point here, instead of asking foreigners what to do with the poor people of Ethiopia who are starving to death not due to only natural causes but mainly political reasons, you should instead advocate for the Ethiopian people to fight to establish a system of governance to WORK their land and produce for themselves.

    Any sane person knows that Ethiopia is endowed with natural resources, specially water to grow food that can meet and exceed the needs of the people.

    The people of Ethiopia have been governed by backward thinking regimes for over a century, this latest famine is not a new phenomenon, it is an outgrowth of decades of mismanagement by despotic regimes which made Ethiopia a punch line among westerners for being the poster child of famine. If western aid could stop famine it would have done so after the first famine to be exposed to the world in 1973.

    Regretably four dacades after the first publically broadcast famine the peopele of Ethiopia are still suffering from man made famine in 2011. Now is the time for Ethiopian diaspora elite to wake up and realize that this perpetual famine will not end until the people of Ethiopia establish a system of governance that gives priority to the people without discrimination, then and only then will famine will be hsitory in Ethiopia, no amount of foreign aid will stop famine.

  6. ALMAAZ on

    I have no any idea why we always are so poor and I think it is the worth time under this norrow mind Woyane.

  7. oneluv21 on

    I think the world ahould help the poor and starving Ethiopians but at the time they should demand that the minority government of the Wayane should relinquish their power to the people of Ethiopia without any delay.

  8. alem on

    kick out all NGO’s and Affilaite organization in 24 to 72 hrs and let the ppl help each other and let them survive the ancient way period. Hand out is not the way to solve our problem

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