Archive for the ‘Ethiopian News’ Category

TPLF will grow more repressive to maintain power: ICG

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

ENTC calls for the formation of transitional government

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Mr. Obang Metho Calls for Calm, Caution and Dialogue

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

In Meles’ death, as in life, a penchant for secrecy, control

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Azeb Mesfin takes part in Bereket Simon’s drama at Bole Airport (video)

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Ethiopian dictator Meles Zenawi’s body left Brussels (video)

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Meles Zenawi’s body “arrives” at Bole Airport this evening

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

A chance to build a new Ethiopia

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Meles Zenawi’s crimes (in photos)

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Hailemariam Dessalegn is appointed as prime minister – ETV

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

A day of joy for Ethiopians; the blood-sucking terrorist tyrant is dead!

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi is dead – ETV (video)

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Ethiopian woman helped police to arrest Dallas murder suspect Abey Belete Girma

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Police found 15 guns and $20,000 in Abey Girma’s 2011 Nissan when he was caught in Colorado

Monday, August 20th, 2012

U.S. Africa Command denies it is meddling in Ethiopian politics

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Why is Ethiopian Airlines overcharging passengers?

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Cheetahs, Hippos and Saving Ethiopia

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Liar, Liar, Liar: thousands confront ETV

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Day 60 of Ethiopian dictator Meles Zenawi’s disappearance

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Murder suspect Abey Belete Girma caught in Aurora, Colorado

Sunday, August 19th, 2012

59th day since the disappearance of Ethiopian dictator Meles Zenawi

Sunday, August 19th, 2012

Massive Muslim protests rock Addis Ababa

Sunday, August 19th, 2012

Leadership vacuum in Ethiopia: Will ethnicity win over competence?

Sunday, August 19th, 2012

BREAKING NEWS: Africom Commander persuaded TPLF to appoint Hailemariam Dessalgn as prime minister

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

Calling Aba Gebremedhin “His Holiness” is an insult to the people of Ethiopia

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

Ethiopians hold hunger strike at the White House

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

Day 58 since Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi disappeared

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

A capital murder warrant issued for Abey Belete Girma

Friday, August 17th, 2012

Dallas murder suspect Abey Belete Girma fled the state

Friday, August 17th, 2012

National Bank of Ethiopia suspends foreign currency exchanges

Friday, August 17th, 2012

Suspect identified in murder of Ethiopian couple in Dallas

Friday, August 17th, 2012

57th day since Ethiopia’s tinpot dictator Meles Zenawi disappeared

Friday, August 17th, 2012

Ethiopians in Dallas grieve the loss of Yayehyirad and Yenenesh; Police close to solving the murder

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

WBAI Radio in New York holds discussion on Meles Zenawi’s disappearance

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

የፍትህ ሚኒስቴር አቶ መለስን ለመተካት የሚያስችል የህግ ረቂቅ አዘጋጀ

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Aba Gebremedhin (formerly Abune Paulos) dies

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Massive capital flight, plea for food aid point to gathering storm in Ethiopia

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

56th day since Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi disappeared; his patriarch died today

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Owners of Desta Ethiopian Restaurant in Dallas TX found dead in front of their home

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

ENTC seeks diplomatic relations with the Government of Sweden

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

Ethiopian dictator’s absence grips nation, fuels speculation (CNN)

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

አቡነ ጳውሎስ በጠና ታመው ሆስፒታል ገብተዋል

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

HRW demands release of Muslim leaders

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

55th day since Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi disappeared

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

The Meles Mystery – Graham Peebles

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Standing up with our Muslim citizens

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Aba Paulos, aka Aba Dabilos, hospitalized, critically ill

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012 http://www.dejeselam.org/2012/08/abune- … l?spref=fb

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TPLF federal police savagely attack civilians (video)

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Sebhat Nega interview on ESAT (audio)

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Day 54 since Ethiopia’s dictator disappeared

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Ethiopian dictator’s absence draws attention, speculation

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Could Susan Rice lead his foreign-policy team next? Should she?

Monday, August 13th, 2012 http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2 … ?page=full

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“What if Mr. Meles Goes for Good?”

Monday, August 13th, 2012

Egypt’s new president replaces army chief Hussein Tantawi

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

Day 53: Meles Zenawi’s vanishing act

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

Day 52: Where is Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

Profits drop 40% at Ethiopian Airlines

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

Fierce battle in London Men’s 5000m (video)

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

Meseret Defar and Tirunesh Dibaba in the Women’s 5000m (full video)

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

Commercial Bank of Ethiopia suspends letters of credit to stop capital flight

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

In wake of London Olympics, BBC remembers legendary Abebe Bikila

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

London: Ethiopians victorious in Women’s 5,000 (video)

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

Day 51 of Ethiopian dictator Meles Zenawi’s disappearance

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

Attack on Ethiopian Muslim press must stop – CPJ

Friday, August 10th, 2012

የመለስ ዜናዊ ከህዝብ እይታ መሰወር

Friday, August 10th, 2012

ጫወታ ስለ ‘የኦሎምፒክ ጫወታዎች’

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Woyanne fedral police attack Muslims in Dessie during prayer

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Day 50 since Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi disappeared

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Civil Service Minister Junedin Saddo squabbles with police over wife’s arrest

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Perils and opportunities ahead of Ethiopia

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Covert succession struggle threatens to fracture TPLF regime – Financial Times

Thursday, August 9th, 2012 http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/c45e4b88 … z234GqqO7h

The prolonged absence of Meles Zenawi, Ethiopia’s usually hyperactive prime minister, has sparked a covert succession struggle at home and prompted fears farther afield for a future without one of east Africa diplomatic and security linchpins.

Government officials say Mr Meles, who has not been seen in public since mid-June, is recovering from a serious illness, but they deny opposition rumours that he is dead or dying at a hospital in Brussels.

An African Union official said Mr Meles had been in regular contact with Thabo Mbeki, South Africa’s former president and AU envoy to Sudan, during recent negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan. He has told AU officials he will be back next month to play a more hands-on role in the next leg of negotiations.

His absence has nevertheless launched a covert succession struggle that threatens to fracture the regime and expose ethnic faultlines at home at a time when the Horn of Africa is struggling to stave off fresh conflicts and overcome terrorist threats.

“We are very concerned about developments in Ethiopia, knowing how fragile the politics are there and the fact there is no clear successor,” Raila Odinga, neighbouring Kenya’s prime minister, told the Financial Times. He admitted that he and other regional leaders were in the dark on Mr Meles’s state of +health.

While Ethiopia is a small contributor to regional blocs such as the AU in financial terms, the Ethiopian premier’s vision and diplomacy has ensured the country has remained central to security affairs in a region threatened by terrorism and conflict. He has also become the voice of Africa on wider issues such as climate change and development.

“The competence vacuum [without Mr Meles] will be serious,” says Mehari Taddele Maru at the Institute for Security Studies in Addis Ababa.

“Ethiopia plays an important role of balancing,” says Mr Mehari, pointing to Ethiopia’s pouring cold water on Uganda’s backing for South Sudan earlier this year, a provocation that threatened regional havoc after South Sudan had invaded a Sudanese oilfield, Heglig.

Mr Meles’s government has twice sent troops into Somalia to fight Islamist militants with US support and regularly brokers deals between fractious neighbours.

“Imagine if that influence is not maintained…Will there even be consensus on Somalia at the AU without him? If it was not for Ethiopia, the Sudan/South Sudan border conflict that erupted on Heglig could have turned into regional war.”

The Ethiopian leader’s adroit diplomatic abilities, honed in the 21 years since he led a Tigrayan guerrilla army to power in Addis Ababa, have furthered his pan-African role and he remains able to muster international support despite grave misgivings over his human rights record at home.

He presents a determined front welcomed by the west even though the regime has long suppressed dissent, closed newspapers and in 2005 shot dead dozens of protesters after elections marred by fraud returned him to power.

“Ethiopia avoids becoming a pariah like Burma because it’s so important to the west in the fight against Islamic terror in Somalia,” says a senior western diplomat who knows Mr Meles. “It is a dictatorship which will keep the people essentially close to the poverty line but charms people like Tony Blair and Bill Clinton.”

Mr Meles announced his intention to retire from office several years ago and had been preparing to step down before the next elections, according to regime insiders. But they say his continued stay has been motivated partly by his desire to outlive his arch-rival, Issaias Afewerki, president of neighbouring Eritrea.

Even government-associated officials now acknowledge Mr Meles may have to step down sooner, saying the deputy prime minister, Hailemariam Desalegne, who is also foreign affairs minister and a technocrat groomed by Mr Meles, would take over.

The country is led by a notional coalition, the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front, in which Mr Meles’s Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front, the guerilla group from northern Ethiopia with whom he came to power, holds sway. “There will be no power vacuum, no political problem in the absence of the party,” insists Abel Abate, a researcher at a state think-tank in Addis Ababa. “Due to the federal system of government, no group or person will take over power. There is no strong man just like Meles in the front.”

But while regime stalwarts insist the party is stronger than Mr Meles himself, critics stress he has constructed an almost exclusive hold on power, firing senior military figures and stacking the military and intelligence echelons with young officers loyal to him alone. Succession is likely to bring strife to Ethiopia’s elite.

Other possible contenders for leadership include the minister of health, Dr Tewodros Adhanom, who is popular in the west, Ethiopian diplomat and senior TPLF cadre Berhane Gebre Kristos and Azeb Mesfin, Mr Meles’s wife.

The TPLF leadership is “campaigning against each other right now”, says Hailu Shawel, an opposition leader previously imprisoned by Mr Meles’s regime. “When somebody has moved the country from a party base to an individual person [Meles], how can you overcome that? Everybody wants to be that dictator.”


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Ethiopia: The quiet before the storm

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

49th day since Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi disappeared

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Hilary Clinton’s hypocrisy on human rights

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012 http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree … aid-africa

American aid to the country once called Zaire appeared to have an amazing effect. The more the US gave its ruler, Mobutu Sese Seko, the shorter Zaire’s roads seemed to get. By the time Mobutu was overthrown in 1997, after two decades of American and other western largesse, his country had just about one tenth of the paved roads it had had at independence in the early Sixties. Once US aid shrank, the roads started getting longer again.

Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, began a tour of Africa this month with a thinly veiled warning that China is out to plunder the continent and its governments would do well to huddle under the protective wing of America’s commitment to freedom. Clinton told an audience in Senegal that, unlike other countries:

"America will stand up for democracy and universal human rights even when it might be easier to look the other way and keep the resources flowing."

She didn’t mention China by name, but everyone got the message. The US secretary of state is getting at a point made by other critics of Beijing’s role in Africa: that China is so hungry for resources it does deals with authoritarian regimes and doles out aid without consideration of issues such as good governance.

That sounds an awful lot like what the US and its allies got up to for decades – with the difference that Chinese aid does sometimes deliver something tangible, such as thousands of kilometres of new roads in the former Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of Congo. Whereas US aid mostly disappeared into Mobutu’s buoyant bank accounts, or was used to buy off the army to keep him in power, China’s deal with the DRC government – trading thousands of kilometres of new roads and rehabilitated railway track for copper and other minerals – is transforming lives by linking up parts of the country cut off from each other for decades except by air.

None of this happened with US and western money. US aid to Mobutu was tied up with the cold war, his support of US-backed rebels fighting Angola’s Marxist government and his general hostility to communism. Barely a word was said – by successive US administrations – about Mobutu’s dire human rights record. Few questions were asked about how, despite the billions of dollars thrown at Kinshasa, Mobutu went on getting richer while the people he ruled got poorer and his country’s infrastructure fell apart.

Mobutu was always welcome at Ronald Reagan’s White House, where the president called him "a voice of good sense and goodwill". Only after the end of the cold war did US policy shift. Washington didn’t need Mobutu anymore. Finally, it could afford to talk about principles without much cost.

It was much the same story with western aid to Rwanda. Hundreds of millions were poured into the tiny country, with France leading the way, to support a regime that would ultimately resort to genocide in an attempt to hang on to power. Yet, it took the Chinese to lift towns such as Kibuye out of their isolation.

Kibuye is just 120km, or 75 miles, west from Rwanda’s capital, Kigali. Twenty years ago, the journey was as much as an eight-hour drive, depending on the rains and on whether, as seemed to happen most days, a bus or lorry was stuck in the deep muddy ravines that opened up on what could only be loosely described as a road. China’s road-builders changed all that, and the journey now is well under two hours – with all the benefits to trade, education and family life that brings.

The pattern across Africa was US support for ideological allies, which included Washington siding with the apartheid regime in South Africa while banning Nelson Mandela’s ANC as a terrorist organisation. It also entailed funding of wars against opponents. Human rights and democracy were too often buried under the needs of cold war realpolitik, as Washington saw them.

US officials argue that "that was then", and it’s different now. But is it? For sure, Washington will make a stand on "democracy and universal human rights" where it does not conflict in a major way with other interests. But where money or security are involved it’s another matter.

Take Equatorial Guinea. Washington had plenty of public criticism for its appalling and bloodstained dictator, Teodoro Obiang Nguema, who has ruled since 1979. The US even pulled out its ambassador, John Bennett, in 1993 after he was accused of being a witch on state radio and threatened with violence. In his departure speech, Bennett named the regime’s worst torturers and Washington closed the embassy three years later. Then, large reserves of oil were discovered in the 1990s: American companies started pumping and everything changed.

Or take Ethiopia. The US is the largest contributor of aid to Addis Ababa, which has been ruled by the same man, Meles Zenawi, for 20 years. He’s received billions of dollars in aid, since American largesse rose sharply after the 9/11 attacks (from a little more than $200m a year to close to $1bn) because Washington came to regard Ethiopia as a frontline in the "war on terror", owing to the presence of Islamist fighters in neighbouring Somalia. The CIA also used Ethiopia as a base for the secret interrogation of hundreds of detainees abducted from other countries, which was likely to have involved torture.

While some of that aid money has benefited ordinary people, a Human Rights Watch report two years ago said Zenawi was "using aid to build a single-party state". It accused the ruling Ethiopian Peoples’ Revolutionary Democratic Front of exercising "total control of local and district administrators to monitor and intimidate individuals at household level" and charged that foreign governments, including the US, were colluding in this repression.

A BBC investigation last year exposed how "the Ethiopian government is using billions of dollars of development aid as a tool for political oppression." It reported that villages failing to support Zenawi are starved of food, seeds and fertiliser.

For all of Clinton’s assurances, the US still finds it easier to look the other way.


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Leasing Ethiopian athletes to foreign governments

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Meles is no longer in charge and never will be again – diplomats

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012 http://www.opendemocracy.net/ren%C3%A9- … fter-meles

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Day 48: The disappearance of Ethiopia’s dictator Meles Zenawi

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Tirunesh Dibaba advances to Women’s 5,000-meter

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

Day 47: The disappearance of Ethiopia’s tin-pot dictator

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

A hunger strike for free speech and free press in Ethiopia

Monday, August 6th, 2012

VOA interviews ENTC leaders; Addisu Abebe’s conduct was shameful

Monday, August 6th, 2012

VIDEO: Ethiopia’s Tiki Gelana at the London Marathon (the last 10 min.)

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Journalist jailed in Ethi­o­pia is championed in D.C., abroad

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Armenian contribution to Ethiopian music

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Women’s Marathon: Ethiopia, Kenya and Russia battle to the finish (the full video)

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Day 46: Has Meles Zenawi Gone AWOL?

Sunday, August 5th, 2012

Egyptian officials discuss new leadership in Ethiopia

Sunday, August 5th, 2012 http://www.bikyamasr.com/74615/in-ethio … ith-egypt/

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Tiki Gelana Wins Marathon Gold

Sunday, August 5th, 2012

Day 45: Where is Ethiopian dictator Meles Zenawi?

Sunday, August 5th, 2012

Agonizing defeat in London men’s 10,000-meter (video)

Sunday, August 5th, 2012

Ethiopian Muslim & Christian solidarity in Washington: VOA

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

Meles Zenawi personal assistant placed under house arrest

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

Day 44: Where is dictator Meles Zenawi?

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

* * * Tirunesh Dibaba blazes to victory (video)

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

ENTC sends request for diplomatic recognition to Italian government

Saturday, August 4th, 2012

Tirunesh Dibaba Wins Olympics Gold Medal In 10000 meters

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

SMNE asks Secretary Clinton not to strike secret deal with TPLF

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Starve the TPLF beast: Boycott Ethiopian Airlines

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Day 43: Where is Meles Zenawi?

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Ethiopia under TPLF ranks 17th among failed states

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012